Changing it Up with Mixer-Dryer-Reactor Acquisition

 

filtration technology
Image source

Starting off 2019, I talked about push pushing ourselves personally and professionally to embrace change. Well, I’m a man of my word, and I’m proud to announce a big change in filtration technology at BHS-Sonthofen GmbH. We’re looking at 2019 as a year of growth, starting with the acquisition of the internationally active AVA-GmbH technology company.

AVA, based just outside of Munich, Germany, has 25+ years under its belt producing innovative machines and efficient processes for any industry. They tackle mixing, drying, reacting, granulating, sterilizing, evaporating, humidifying, and homogenizing to combine engineering expertise and project management know-how to provide “tailor-made solutions from a single source.”

AVA’s product portfolio is a perfect fit with BHS. Having already cooperated with them on joint projects in the past, we can be sure that our company is only strengthened by this move.

In addressing the sale, Dennis Kemmann, Managing Director of BHS-Sonthofen GmbH was enthusiastic about the opportunity to combine our products to have an “even more comprehensive offering in all of our chemical, pharmaceutical and other markets.” 

Expanding Process Filtration Technology Technologies

BHS’s latest newsletter looks at the pairing in more particular applications. You can read more about selecting AVA Vertical or Horizontal Mixer-Dryers for Batch of or Continuous Operations. The goal is a streamlined approach handling as many processes as possible in one unit to curtail investment and process costs. 

Three of AVA’s multipurpose process machines are presented as possibilities to cover the vast majority of the application spectrum of the powder and granule processing industry:

  • AVA Vertical mixer-dryers for batch operation
  • AVA Horizontal mixer-dryers for batch operation
  • AVA Horizontal mixer-dryers for continuous operation

The newsletter also mentions the AVA test center in Germany, which allows customers to scale up from 15 – 90 liter batch mixer-dryer to full scale batch and continuous operations with full scale-up reports and drying curves issued after testing. The US test center in Charlotte, North Carolina will be completed in 4Q, 2019.

Ultimately, the AVA acquisition is good news for current and prospective clients. This change means more innovative process engineering solutions as well as an expanded team to support our customers. The combination of BHS and AVA systems will provide important process benefits for turnkey projects for our clients worldwide. Let me know what we can do for you!

6 Global Trends Driving Filtration and Separation Technology Innovation

filtration and separation

This guest blog by Molly Henry of the American Filtration and Separations Society (AFS), appeared on their site (with my editorial assistance). For those who missed the original, I thought it was information worth sharing again here (in edited form) regarding the global filtration market.

As our population grows and urbanizes, so does our need for clean energy, pure water, increased food supplies, advanced medical care, and improved digital devices and processing power. Filtration and separation suppliers, as an enabling technology to most industries, must continually evolve to increase capacity and improve filtration performance. This blog examines the trends necessitating innovation. 

Population growth will drive demand, which will require increased production and manufacturing efficiency for industrial products, foods and beverages, transportation, and infrastructure. All of which means a greater need for filtration and separation technology.

Rapid urbanization on a global scale requires new and improved infrastructure, including water, power, communications and transportation; all of which require filtration.

Disruptive digital technology changes have dramatically improved computer processing for several decades, and trends call for this to continue. As computer circuits have grown smaller and smaller while increasing in processing power, filtration and separation technologies have also become increasingly more sophisticated.

Natural resource scarcity and climate change will make it increasingly difficult to supply an ever-growing population with clean water. This will drive greater use of desalination technologies. Recycling and reusing of wastewater on a consumer, commercial and industrial scale will become the norm. Filtration and separation technology make all these processes possible.

Transformative advances in healthcare will allow people to live longer, healthier, and more productive lives. A part of this process will be advances in diagnostic and drug therapies, which utilize filtration and separation technologies. At the same time, a focus on a cleaner environment and all natural and pure consumables, will see more industries utilizing filtration and separation rather than chemical technologies to make products safe and pure.

The race to zero emissions and zero discharge for industrial manufacturing, public utilities, automotive and aerospace will be a technology challenge on many fronts. Filtration and separation are among the major enabling technologies for this purify, recycle, and reuse process.

Whatever role you play, keeping an eye on these megatrends will serve you and your constituents well in the quest for long-term growth and value creation in the global filtration market. 

 

Innovation Grown from Oranges

sustainable innovation
Photo credit: photoschafl via Foter.com / CC BY-NC-ND

I have written over the years about sustainability; you may remember Ford & Jose Cuervo. Today, I’m writing about a new idea for sustainable innovation grown from the rinds and seeds of Sicily’s most famous citrus fruit — the orange.

The orange, which Sicily harvests several hundred thousand tons each year, is being used in a wide range of greener and healthier business initiatives.

The innovation is as impressive as the filtration technology used to give consumers the pulp-free OJ they drink at breakfast on a given morning!

Oranges & Textiles

In 2011, Adriana Santonocito was a design student in Milan and had an idea to make sustainable textiles from Sicilian oranges. People already knew how to extract cellulose from orange rinds, but Adriana developed a process to make fiber which could be blended and the color-dyed with other textiles such as cotton or polyester. She and her classmate Enrica Arena founded Orange Fiber in 2014 and are now selling the silk-like material to the famous Italian fashion designer Salvatore Ferragamo. 

sustainable innovation
Source: Ferragamo

 

What else from the oranges?

They are also making baked goods healthier, and stay fresher, thanks to a new procedure which transforms them into an innovative fat-free flour /citrus paste. Pastazzo is flour made from the orange rinds, seeds and part of the pulp not used for juice. The “brioche” from this flour has the same taste and look of brioche made with butter/fats/oils but much healthier.

sustainable innovation
Source: La Sicilia

Although we’ve yet to be employed working with oranges, BHS has applied its leadership  in sustainability to feedstocks and applications including:

  • Corn cobs and stovers
  • Wood chips
  • Bagasse / Sugar cane
  • Dairy waste and chicken renderings
  • Algae and microbial for PHA
  • Fish Oils
  • Biocatalysts

I’d be happy to tell you more about our technology for filtration, cake washing and drying of these natural products with the BHS vacuum belt filter and rotary pressure filter.

Or, let us know your feedstocks and we can brainstorm new ideas for sustainable innovation. In the meantime, be aware you may be wearing something that you can eat!

4 Key Differences between Filtration and Centrifugation

I’m always looking to collaborate and explore ideas with others in our filtration technology business. Happily, director of Oriental Manufacturers Jigar Patel, has offered this guest blog discussing differences between filtration and liquid solid centrifugation. I hope you enjoy Patel’s perspective:

liquid solid centrifugation
Photo by gemmerich on Foter.com / CC BY-SA

Filtration and centrifugation are two distinct separation techniques used for isolating the required components from the mixture. The major difference between the techniques is the nature of the force employed and the separation method used. While filtration uses a sieve or filter media to strain undesired constituents, centrifugation leverages the power of the centrifugal force for the separation.

What is Filtration?

Filtration is a physical separation technique, by pressure, vacuum or gravity, used for segregating one or more components from a mixture for different applications. Depending on the application, the process may employ one or multiple metal perforated layers or filter mesh for solid-liquid separation. 

What is Centrifugation? 

Centrifugation is a process that employs a centrifugal force to separate the elements of the liquid slurry.  The remaining liquid (supernatant) is then transferred from the centrifuge tube or removed without disturbing the precipitate. The precipitating particles left behind depend on the speed of the machine, the shape and size of the particles and their volume, viscosity, and density.

4 Major Differences between Filtration and Centrifugation

#1 Nature of Operation 

  • Filtration 

Large particles in a mixture are unable to pass through the perforated layers of the filter. Yet fluids and small particles easily pass through the filter mesh under the pressure, vacuum, or gravitational force. 

  • Liquid Solid Centrifugation 

The centrifugal machine forces the heavier solids to the bottom creating a firm cake. The lighter mixture that stays above the cake is then decanted. 

#2 Separation Techniques

  • Filtration 

Filtration uses different techniques depending on the expected outcome which can be classified as pressure, vacuum, or gravitational.

  • Centrifugation 

Centrifugation techniques can be classified as micro-centrifuges, high-speed centrifuges and ultra-centrifugations. Microcentrifuge is typically used for research studies that require the processing of biological molecules in very small volumes. High-speed centrifugal machines are designed to handle bigger batches and are mainly used for processing industrial mixtures on a large scale. The ultra-centrifugation technique is used to study the properties of biological particles.

#3 Function 

  • Filtration 

The main function of filtration is getting the desired output by eliminating impurities from any given liquid or isolating solids from a mixture. 

  • Centrifugation 

The main purpose of centrifugation is fast, efficient separation of solids from a liquid solution or slurry.

#4 Efficiency 

  • Filtration 

Simple filtration techniques take time separating the desired materials, which makes the separation method less efficient. 

  • Centrifugation 

Centrifugation techniques employ machines that run with the aid of power, so the separation method is faster and more efficient. 

Both filtration and centrifugation are solid-liquid separation techniques that use different equipment and have different applications.

My two cents: Deciding which one is best suited to your process will take work. No matter the process in question, engineers are well served by taking the time to gather the information, make their own comparisons, and then develop a process solution.

Thanks to Jigar Patel. The director of Oriental Manufacturers believes in the power of good functional designs and their ability to boost productivity and drive growth. Fueled by his passion for innovation and all things EPC, Jigar writes on topics related to process plant equipments, process machinery production, turnkey solutions, best industry practices, liquid solid centrifugation, and his personal insights!‌

Keep the sharing going — let me know what you want to write about in this spot next!

Chemical Process Optimization needs Out of the Box Thinking

chemical process optimization
A continuous vacuum belt filter with 9.0-m2 filter area.

Loyal readers of this blog know how much I value innovation and creativity. So, you can’t be surprised that I want to share with you a chemical process optimization success story. We partnered with a client to develop an optimized filtration process for a zinc oxide product.

As discussed in a coauthored article for Chemical Processing, Madison Industries and BHS-Sonthofen Inc. worked together on laboratory and field pilot testing. Engineers from both firms showed creativity and “outside-the-box” thinking in looking at the process from new vantage points in their quest to find a better option than the installed batch filter press.

Our efforts led to the selection of continuous vacuum filtration. The continuous filter, which was installed in 2016, provides maximum filtration efficiency and improves product quality while increasing yield and reducing operating and maintenance costs.

chemical process optimization
Figure 1. Technology, based on fixed vacuum trays, features step-wise movement of filter media.

Case Background

Madison Industries, based in Old Bridge, N.J., supplies copper and zinc compounds such as copper sulfate, copper carbonate, zinc sulfate, zinc chloride, zinc orthophosphate and phosphoric acid as well as other chemical products containing copper and zinc. Applications include animal feed, water treatment, dairy farming, food and pharmaceutical processing, and pool and wood preservative chemicals, among others.

The Madison facility was using a plate-and-frame filter press to filter a zinc oxide slurry made from a mix of various zinc feedstocks. The solids were mixed with water to form a slurry of 20% solids and then filtered. The cake was bagged in 2,000-lb totes, moved to another area of the plant and reslurried in sulfuric acid for further processing.

Madison wanted to expand production and replace the present labor-intensive process with a continuous operation — this led to chemical process optimization.

Crucial Tests

BHS process engineers began laboratory evaluation of the process. Madison was open to all ideas and formed a team to brainstorm different approaches.

BHS conducted several weeks of testing and evaluated both pressure and vacuum filtration based upon the specific characteristics of the solids and slurries. The testing led to the following observations:

• Filtrate clarity: The most-appropriate filter cloth is a double-weave 12-micron polypropylene.
• Filtration rate: Vacuum filtration produced the maximum filtration flux rate at a cake thickness of 6 mm.
• Cake washing: Maximum displacement washing was achieved with wash ratios of 2.6:1.
• Cake moisture: Although not a critical parameter because the cake is reslurried, cake moisture is approximately 35%.

Based on its creative testing, BHS’s process engineers recommended continuous-indexing vacuum filtration as the optimum option.

Why Continuous Indexing

The BHS continuous-indexing vacuum belt filter provides for vacuum filtration, cake washing, pressing and drying of high solids slurries. The technology is based upon fixed vacuum trays, a continuously feeding slurry system and indexing or step-wise movement of the filter media (see Figure 1). In practical terms, the belt filter operates similarly to a series of Buchner funnels.

At each indexed belt position, washing and drying efficiencies are maximized with the stopped belt and the mechanism of plug flow for gases and liquids. Cake pressing and squeezing further enhance drying. Finally, the fixed trays allow for the mother liquor and the wash filtrates to be recovered individually and recirculated/recovered/reused for a more efficient operation. The design also can integrate steaming as well as counter-current washing.

Successful Switch

Madison and BHS installed the vacuum belt filter in 2016. The unit has met all product quality specifications. Madison has realized a 50% savings in wash liquids per batch as well as a reduction in labor and operating costs because the vacuum belt filter operation is fully automatic. Since the installation, Madison has optimized the operation, improving yields and minimizing costs.

The Madison and BHS collaboration illustrates a successful relationship between client and technology supplier. The BHS approach of lab and pilot testing, coupled with idea-generation, fosters identifying the optimal option for critical and difficult solid/liquid separations.

Lessons Learned from Nathan’s

“You can take the boy out of Brooklyn, but you can’t take Brooklyn out of the boy.”

Business Innovation
Photo credit: drpavloff via Foter.com / CC BY-ND

Growing up in Brooklyn, I could bicycle about 5 miles to the ocean and Coney Island. I would always stop at Nathan’s Famous. The stop was always for a hot dog, some fries, a Coke, and then a day on the beach. For those who do not know, Nathan’s has sold more than 500 million (all-beef) hot dogs since its inception; it’s brand of hotdogs are now available at more than 53,000 outlets in all 50 states and 10 foreign countries.

I may not be one of the celebrity loyalists — those included performers such as Cary Grant, Barbara Streisand, gangsters Al Capone, Scarface, Bugsy Siegel, and politicians Bernie Sanders, President Donald Trump… But how does this memory relate to a business innovation blog?

Lessons Learned from Nathan’s

Nathan Handwerker, an Eastern European Jewish immigrant arrived at Ellis Island speaking not a word of English, unable to read or write, and with twenty-five dollars hidden in his shoes. He had a simple goal: work hard, remain fiercely loyal to what matters most, customers and employees, and stay focused on what you know best. Nathan’s began in 1916 and recently celebrated its 100th anniversary. The Coney Island location is now home, of course, to the 4th of July hot-dog eating contest.

Whether or not you’re dealing with hotdogs, though, we can all learn from Nathan’s. First, stay loyal. This cuts across all aspects of work and family. BHS is over 400 years old, so we have been around a long time. But staying loyal to your business, process, technology or whatever you are engaged with is critical to success.

Nathan’s always focused on “quality food at a fair price” to “bring the customers back.” Nathan personally checked every hot dog that came into the restaurant as well as oil temperature for the fries and grill temperature. As a technology supplier, quality at a fair price is what we do. On the operations side, providing quality chemicals, pharmaceuticals, etc., is the key to survival.

Initially Nathan’s sold hot dogs for 10 cents, the same price as the popular Coney Island outpost Feltman’s beer garden. Then, the enterprising young entrepreneur, after netting a mere $60 in his first days of business, decided to lower his prices to 5 cents. With higher volume his next week’s receipts totaled $260. This was the first fast-food price war and one of the brand’s first innovations.

Nathan’s also introduced the food industry to purifying the cooking oil, refrigeration and cleanliness as well as “chow mein on a bun” and beer after prohibition.

Loyalty, quality, business innovation…seems that I learned a lot from those “old” Brooklyn days. Let me know how your younger days influenced your career. I’m sure we will hear some interesting stories.

The Inspiration of Travel

business travel

In mid-April, I attended GasTech 2017 in Tokyo. The focus of GasTech was Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) and its impact on the world’s energy balance, carbon emissions and technology. At the same time I was focused on all the interesting characteristics of Japan itself — it was my first time visiting. I always find I am truly inspired by business travel and the new experiences it brings.

Novel Experiences in Japan

As in all countries, Japan has its own unique characteristics. There is a sense oforderliness that you do not find in many places around the world. On escalators, for example, you stand on the left and walk on the right. Plus, smoking, eating, drinking, cell phone talking in public are considered impolite and are frowned upon.

However, bicycles have free rein. During our trip, we biked 13 miles throughout Tokyo; what a ride! Speaking of rides, the trains go everywhere and run all of the time and are the safest that I have used. You only need two maps (rail and subway) and then you are fine.

We were also there during the famous cherry blossom season. We enjoyed white, red, pink, weeping willows. Who would have known there were so many different types? Even if you travel there in another season you won’t want to miss the beauty of Japanese gardens. business travel

All You Need is Arigato

Handling money and credit cards is rather interesting. There are small trays near every register and you place your money the tray. Credit cards are presented with two hands and a nod of the head. Don’t worry about tipping as there is no tipping and high quality service is the norm. Only an “Arigato,” or thank you, is necessary.

You may be familiar with Japanese food such as sushi or tempura but the taste in Japan is unique. Also try specialty ramen, soba and udon noodles. Japanese “hot pot” styles, nabemono, are common with many different types of oils and broths including tofu and my favorite vegetables of konjac and the satoimo root (sweet taro). With your meal, enjoy a Japanese beer or cold, lukewarm, or hot sake. You might even try a paired dinner with different sake for each course.

business travel

Finally, be sure to balance your business with visits to the imperial palaces, Shinto and Buddhist shrines, and Tokyo’s 47 neighborhoods. We also enjoyed a Tokyo Giants baseball game! Check out my photos, and let’s meet in Japan for business together.

Innovating Zero Gravity Espresso

chemical engineering problems
Image source: foter.com

Ambition to improve is everywhere, and not only limited to corporate labs and academia. I love to see examples of innovation in any field — from wind turbines to cloud seeding or surfing to strawberries. Those who are loyal readers of this blog know that I’ve already written about each of those. Today though I am turning to some new tech that relates to what we do every day to solve chemical engineering problems.

Despite what contrarians might say, humans long ago solved the mystery of making perfect coffee on earth. Yet building an espresso machine for the international space station was a much bigger challenge. Bloomberg last year featured an Italian engineering firm, Argotec, spent over 18 months with 11 engineers working to develop a microgravity brewing process that could meet NASA’s rigorous safety standards.

In Earth gravity, we force almost boiling water through finely ground coffee beans. The water boils, becomes less dense and the steam pushes into the air above. But hot water behaves differently in near-zero gravity. The steam does not rise; staying put it can create a dangerous vapor bubble suspended in a ball of water. So, to avoid bubbles, Argotec used a special thin-steel pipe to ensure the water couldn’t build up heat bubbles.

The next problem was pressure. NASA safety rules anything over 60 psig a concern. Espresso brewing requires at least twice as much pressure. Argotec engineers determined that they could address this by eliminating a traditional rotary pump and instead using an electric motor to drive the plunger.

What about leaks and pressure relief? This is a common problem for all chemical plants, but even more difficult in zero gravity. Argotec made it so that every piece of pipe had relief valves with piping back to a central pressure containment chamber.

 

That left the question of how to drink an espresso in outer space? Think, after all, of the Tang crystals that are so famous as a space drink. The espresso-loving engineers designed a mechanism to blow air through the coffee capsule into a zip-lock coffee cup.

chemical engineering problems

We all know how nice it is to have a hot espresso when trying to solve a process-related chemical engineering problem. Now our astronauts have the same opportunity to get the brain cells jumping in space. This is yet another exciting example of how process engineers have to brainstorm new approaches to separation problems.

Groundbreaking Study of Filtration Technology

 

filtration and separation technology
Photo credit: Moyan_Brenn via Foter.com / CC BY

This blog has long touted the importance of testing, testing and more testing. It’s probably fortunate I don’t teach filtration and separation technologies — my students would be complaining about all of my quizzes and exams as I applied my mantra literally!

Still, it remains amazing to me that with the critical importance of good information about filter aids, filter media and filtration technologies, that there isn’t one comprehensive approach to filter aid usage, filter media and wrapping all of this into filtration technology selection.

Yes, you can find abundant information about each in the literature and the filtration marketplace. Industry experts and suppliers cover these exhaustively, but their writing is focused inwardly.

For instance, you might learn about specific applications such as:
applied mineral filter aids in beer filtration
separating niter when boiling sap for maple syrup
• filtering wine with diatomaceous earth filter aid (DE)

And reading these, you would not be blamed for longing for a drink or a sweet treat. Here’s one more on filtering liquid chocolate – just to be sure your mouth is watering.

Yet, no matter the manufacturing process in question, its left to the engineers to gather this information, make their own comparisons and then develop a process solution. With so many sources helping the process engineer “find the right machine,” or offering “a high performance solution you can rely on” it’s challenging to make the best choice.

BHS aims to change this in filtration and separation technology. We’re right now undertaking a groundbreaking study to develop a comprehensive approach to the marketplace. Our research and testing is now underway with a completion date of August 2017, but we’d welcome your contributions and ideas!

Relentless Ambition to Improve and Undersea Turbines

Ambition to improve is not just limited to corporate labs or academia. We also see this at work in a time-honored place — the garage. I encountered a story recently of innovation in manufacturing tested and perfected in the garage but conceived in an even more unlikely place: prison .

When Bloomberg featured Herbert Williams in its Energy section, the title of the article was “The Ex-Con Inventor Disrupting Underwater Energy.” In fact, Williams developed his plans for one of the first commercial-scale turbines meant to convert tidal energy to electricity while serving time in prison.

“Prison set me down, allowing me to stop and think,” Williams said in the Bloomberg piece.

innovation in manufacturing
Image source: Bloomberg

Where Innovation Comes From

We all strive for some quiet time to think and develop ideas, strategies, etc. My favorite time is in the sauna after exercising or doing a head-stand in my “hot yoga” class. Williams made some mistakes, but he did his time and while in prison turned to his passion for the love of boats and the sea. He learned technical drawing from a fellow inmate and started coming up with ideas: “I had to make these things to keep a sense of purpose,” he said. “Maybe I made them to show I exist.”

His sense of purpose saw Herbert combining his love of boats and tinkering in a windowless garage to overcome a tough engineering challenge… building a turbine to withstand salt water, and microorganisms as well as to handle the stress of water, 800 times more dense than air.

His innovative solutions included bolting the rotor blades to the rim of the turbine, just like spokes on a bicycle wheel. While this sounds simple, Willams (collaborating with other engineers along the way) also realized that by adding magnets and hand-wound conducive coils he could avoid the need for lubrication. To test that his design wouldn’t seize in cold ocean water, he even tested his idea out in an old aboveground swimming pool loaded with ice.

Engineering Misfits

Patents for his design sold to the Irish company OpenHydro and today massive 300-ton, 52-foot-high versions of the Williams design are deployed in Canada’s Bay of Fundy as well as in Brittany, France. He has joined the Misfits I wrote about a few months ago, those on the outside who make a real difference.

As Herbert says, “if all of the entrepreneurs and tinkerers in the country left it to GE and Westinghouse, we’d be in big trouble.”

Innovation is everywhere. This is just one example of innovation in manufacturing. Let me know what you are working on and when you have time to think.