The Wisdom of Silence this Summer

dawn sunset beach woman
Photo by Jill Wellington on Pexels.com

       

2020 has gotten off to a really weird start. Many of us have been working remotely, trying to continue to design projects and meet with clients. But, even in the best of situations, we can lose track of ourselves in the process. Consider the wisdom of silence.

This feeling of being pulled in too many directions at once need not be inevitable. We can find ways to ground ourselves amidst all the chaos. Create moments of stillness where you can.

When silence is intentional, it is valuable and restorative. Check out my blog about Sherlock Holmes and the value he found in taking a moment to just think. The great detective would employ occasional silence and distancing for problem solving. In the BBC’s version they show this when Benedict Cumberbatch retreats to his “mind palace.”

We may not have mind palaces, or even mind sheds, but finding silence can bring us back to our senses. Like intentional breathing, which I’ve written about before, silence is essential to our holistic well-being. Silence is a powerful tool that allows us to take a step back from the atmosphere around us and realign with our intentions and ourselves.

Realigning Intentions — Professionally and Personally

I started the year offering a roadmap for 2020. Now, as a midway check-in, here are my suggestions for what we can do to benefit our personal and work lives.

  1. Listen to the customers.  First, broaden your definition of customer. Customers can be your clients, coworkers, vendors, your family. Listen and learn from their feedback and suggestions.
  1. Be useful.  If you listen, you can be useful. And there’s nothing more rewarding than being of use to others.
  1. Make things faster and simpler. Of course, this can’t be at the expense of accuracy, but try not to overly complicate decisions, tasks, actions, etc. We must strive to reduce complications.
  1. Innovate, don’t imitate. To succeed, we need to continually look for new approaches. We love experiments. They help us think differently.
  1. Give back. At some point in all of our lives, we’ve received other people’s help. Try to give back this summer. This may seem like one more thing to cram into the schedule, but the benefits will outweigh that aspect.
  1. Be honest. Speak in an open and ethical manner. As I’ve discussed before, this may even mean being authentic and expressing anger. It’s better to communicate fully than to let resentments fester or leave frustrations unattended.
  1. Keep learning and improving. Loyal readers know that this is a key point for me.  There’s (always) plenty of room for improvements and innovation. That’s how we create better experiences for all.  

As the start of summer approaches, let’s set aside time to tune out the noise. Turn off your device. Go for a walk or simply close your eyes. The magic in the wisdom of silence is that we can access it wherever we are — though I’ll be hoping you get to try this somewhere you love in the coming months (without the social distancing considerations!).

Common Myths About Engineers

common myths about engineers
Image source

As a regular reader of Chemical Engineering Progress (CEP), I was impressed to see its Editor-in-Chief Cindy Mascone writing her monthly editorial as a poem. She mentioned that when she writes for the magazine “accuracy, clarity, and conciseness take precedence over all else.” But that doesn’t mean she can’t be creative too! Her poem got me thinking about common myths about engineers.

  1. We aren’t creative
  2. We lack social skills
  3. We want to fix everything (whether it needs it or not)
  4. We’re quantitative wonks
  5. We are boring (just in case that wasn’t clear from being a quantitative wonk)
  6. We’re not open to new areas of inquiry or interest

Get to know an engineer!

Of course, I beg to differ. I like to think of this blog as one outlet for creativity. Plus, every time we come up with a new solution or problem-solve in a new way, we’re showing not only critical, but also creative thinking.

I’ve written a lot about troubleshooting in filtration technology, but not because we do it for kicks. We do it to improve a process or solve a problem. Really, we’d rather be innovating — which, again, is just how non-boring and creative we can be.

We may know our numbers, and some of us can be a little socially awkward (but plenty of liberal arts enthusiasts are too). Still, I’d argue that we are generally creative, inquisitive, and downright interesting folks!

And now, because I know you’re curious, I can also share the poem itself:

Ode to the March 2019 Issue of CEP

This month we feature process intensification

One aspect of which may be flow augmentation

Equipment that is smaller or does more than one function

To the old paradigm, PI causes disruption.

The first article tells of three RAPID teams

Whose projects are the stuff of dreams

Microwaves, solar hydrogen, and hydrofracking

Energy-saving ideas, they are not lacking.

A dividing-wall column replaces two towers with one

It changes the way distillation is done

With a smaller footprint and lower capital cost

And on top of that, no efficiency’s lost.

So how do you optimize an intensified route?

That’s what the next article is about

Use this building block approach to process design

And watch your energy use decline.

A digital twin software tools can create

To capture the process’s every possible state

You can study alternatives and run what-if tests

To figure out which option is best.

This issue contains many other things, too

Whatever your interests, there’s something for you

The same can be said of the Spring Meeting which will

Take place in New Orleans and be quite a thrill

Check out the preview after page seventy-four

For sessions and keynotes and events galore.

I’ve run out of space so now I must stop

But if you like this poem, to the website please hop

There’s more rhyming about CEP and its staff

I hope I have made you smile and laugh.

Thank you for coming to read more of my poem

On the website or app that is our virtual home.

The authors who write for this fine magazine

Do it not for the money but to get their names seen

By thousands of people at sites far and wide

For this publication is a valuable guide.

The topics they cover in their technical articles

Range from safety and computers to fluids and particles

From water and energy, from bio to dust

From nano to columns that are resistant to rust

From instrumentation to exchangers of heat

Among chemical magazines, CEP can’t be beat.

Our readers know not what we editors do

To make the articles understandable for you

Each page is read over many times with great care

To ensure that no typos can be found anywhere

That tables and figures are in the right places

That all the text fits with no empty spaces

That references include all the necessary data

That symbol font correctly displays mu, rho, and beta

That hyphens appear everywhere hyphens are needed

That the proofreader’s comments have been fully heeded.

We take pride in our work and we love what we do

Bringing the latest technology and information to you

But now we must turn to next month’s content

And make sure every moment on the job is well spent.

Reprinted with permission from Chemical Engineering Progress (CEP), March 2019. Copyright © 2019 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE)

Inspired to write your own technical poetry? Engineering verse? I’d love to see it and share it here! Who knows, maybe there is an anthology in the works!

 

Moonshot & Management Lessons   

Management lessons

2019 is the 50th anniversary of the Miracle Mets World Series-winning season, Joe Namath and the New York Jets taking the Super Bowl title, and the New York Knicks’ NBA Championship win with Bill Bradley. 1969 was quite a time for me as I was growing up a sports fan in Brooklyn. But now that I’m older, I find I’m more drawn to the management lessons we can glean from something else that happened in 1969 — Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Mike Collins landing on the moon.  

In July, a Businessweek story presented five management lessons we can learn from the “Moonshot.” Although many of us remember the key moments, the history covered at the start of the article is interesting for the controversies we may have forgotten. Nevertheless, the bigger appeal for me is in what we can learn from the Apollo Moon Landing.

Have a clear objective. Author Peter Coy tells us, “President John F. Kennedy vastly simplified NASA’s job with his May 25, 1961, address to Congress committing to ‘the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to Earth.’” That singular focus helped “NASA engineers [to keep] their heads down and their slide rules busy.” 

It’s the same in our work environments. If the project has a clear objective from the outset, the operating company, engineering company and vendor teams can all work together to accomplish the project from a technical and budget point of view.

Harness incongruence.  NASA had several setbacks with the moon launch. But, as in all science, we learn from our mistakes. We must look at the problem from all angles and, as we know from Sherlock Holmes, it’s important to recognize: 

  • There is no benefit in jumping to conclusions.
  • Working with others to recreate events can be beneficial.
  • The need for problem-solving skills such as occasional silence or distancing and learning to discern the crucial from the incidental.

Delegate but decide.  This is the essence of leadership. NASA spent over 90% of its budget on sub-contractors. Many of our projects are the same. You need to know when you need help. Then, the project team must have a strong leadership team in place to make the hard decisions, especially when teams are scattered across the world, have different cultures and languages, etc.  

Effectiveness over elegance.  This is my favorite lesson. I’ve seen its truth often, especially when it comes to the PLC controls on a project. There is always the next best instrument, controller, valve, actuator, human-machine interface, etc. Every engineer wants that his or her project to incorporate the newest solutions, but sometimes a simpler control will allow the operators to manage the process more efficiently. Whether you go for effective or elegant, remember to involve the entire team to make the process safe and understandable.  

Improvise. Coy shares many examples of how NASA and the astronauts improvised solutions.  We have all heard the phrase, “Hello Houston, we have a problem.” On our projects, we need listen to all team members to find the correct solution. Maybe we’ll improvise something that is a little beyond what we know; but this is how technology improves.

It’s amazing to think all of this was 50 years ago but these management lessons still hold true today! Now, if someone wants to share their thoughts on what we can learn from the Mets, Jets, and Knicks’ managers, I’d be happy to walk down that memory lane too!

Agile Project Teams in Engineering

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Engineering these days requires agility. We’re reconfiguring processes, and we need to be flexible with time zones, languages, accents, engineering cultures and operating philosophies. We cannot always select the people on our projects and must work with various teams to be successful.  How do we do this? McKinsey & Company insights into Agile Project Teams provides some interesting insights.

Let’s apply their practical observations from How to Select and Develop Individuals for Successful Agile Teams: A Practical Guide to process engineering.

First, when approaching a new process problem, it’s important for everyone to understand handling ambiguity with agreeableness leads to success. This includes the engineering and operating company teams and technology suppliers.

Processes are complex; there are many choices for the design. I have one project at the moment where the solvents/solids are toxic and hazardous, the solids polymerize immediately, and the operating conditions are severe.  There are over fifteen (15) different options for the solid-liquid separation technology design.  McKinsey’s research would suggest our project team needs to work through each option while keeping the focus on a safe and acceptable solution.

The guide suggests, Agreeableness means saying “yes, and…” instead of “yes, but.” It’s not about avoiding conflict or blindly agreeing without any thinking. It’s about testing ideas while being open to feedback.

Agility in Engineering Projects

Per McKinsey’s analysis, the agile project team’s focus must be on outcomes. “Agile teams take ownership of the product they deliver. For them, pride in the product (the outcome) sits higher than pride in the work (the process): they know that the process can and will change as they review the relationship between the process and value it achieves.”

Each step in the process moves the team closer to the desired outcome to achieve the overall objective: optimum technology selection to achieve quality while meeting environmental and safety requirements.

Finally, everyone must work as a team on successful agile projects. Sometimes different agendas must be reconciled.  Neuroticism can be an obstacle: “team members need to be able to stay calm when unexpected errors and issues arise.”

Find ways to foster a cooperative spirit. Years ago, I worked on a project where the operating company implemented a program rewarding team members that came up with ideas or creative solutions and showed cost savings. In fact, our vendor team was rewarded for including a special type of dust filter to capture solids from the vacuum dryer. As you can imagine, it’s not often the operating company provides additional compensation to the vendor!

The McKinsey study concludes, “great teams do not mean technically the best people or the most experienced.” Agility serving a shared focus on the goal can make the team even better. Next time, you’re on a project, keep these points in mind. Let me know if you are successful!

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Goodbye 2019, Hello 2020!

man with fireworks
Photo by Rakicevic Nenad on Pexels.com

A new year is a great time for a shift in direction. This blog tries to be different each time. I cover topics ranging from innovation to technical leadership. I’m always looking for fresh ways of doing things in our industry, in process engineering and business development. And I look for new ways to convey these ideas to the marketplace. 

In 2019, I talked about clarification technologies, types of engineers, innovation risk, and the creativity of the octopus. In 2020, look for blogs on orangutans, moonshots, and agile methodology and engineering. But for right now, as we look forward to celebrating a new year, here are some ideas to help you try a new highway in 2020. 

We have a chance for the next decade to be a new roaring ‘20s. Don’t get stuck taking the same routes you’ve always been traveling. Try these approaches for a novel approach to 2020 and beyond:

  • Adopt a positive mindset and see the opportunities

Its easy to get bogged down when a process is not working or a project is going sideways. Learn to accept – everything from setbacks through to challenges. Turn these diversions from your plan or expectations into opportunities.  

  • Be brave and stick to your guns

Maybe you are the innovator with a new idea of how things should be done. If you are sure about the design or process change, then go ahead and make the change.  Remember, to test first and to have all of your facts in place to show technical leadership.

  • Make room for your own creative projects

No matter your work focus, set aside time for your own projects.  Take one hour each morning (for me after yoga) and before you check your e-mails for your personal projects; this will pay off greatly in the long term, on many levels.

  • Don’t let the pressure or threat of failure or competition hold you back 

Be confident in your work and don’t be afraid to try something different. We always learn from our mistakes, and from getting out there and gathering more information. With greater knowledge comes greater confidence.

  • Be authentic and believe in yourself

Use more of your judgement and less of other’s opinions. As I have written in the past,    learning never ends. And if you try to be what other people want of you, instead of being authentic, it can have negative impacts both on your professional life and personal well-being.

  • Don’t ignore your gut but tread carefully

Decision making is never easy. Read more about troubleshooting and how to make better decisions in my 2017 blog.

  • Accept that personal progress can take time but perseverance counts

Any goal takes time.  As loyal readers already know, I sometimes mention my yoga practice, which includes headstands, shoulder stands, tripod stands, etc. These did not happen overnight. But by persevering and keeping an eye on small moments of personal progress along the way, I was able to stick with it and see greater success long-term.

Let’s get ready for 2020. I’ll continue working on this blog and providing new BHS and AVA technical and innovative insights on, Perlmutter & Idea Development.  As you start anew in this fresh decade, I hope you’ll keep reading my blog and my LinkedIn posts. And don’t hesitate to let me know your ideas about technical leadership and other areas of interest for this blog!

Innovation Risks & Two Success Stories    

innovation risks
Image source: Business Week

One key element of innovation success is taking risks. I’ve recently read two articles where major breakthroughs in human health started with innovation risks. The two stories are a great reminder that we need to step up to challenges and look at the world anew to innovate!

In our first case, from Business Week, a chemical engineer named David Whitlock became interested in biology after a tubby date asked him why her horse rolls in the dirt, even in the cool springtime months before the biting insects have even hatched. Whitlock was curious too. So he started reading scientific papers and came across a “bacteria, found in soil and other natural environments, that derives energy from ammonia rather than organic matter.”

Whitlock’s took risks for his research. In 2009, he moved into his white Dodge Grand Caravan to study the bacteria culled from soil that he theorized could improve skin disorders, hypertension, and other health problems. And even he’ll admit there were some times he really smelled while experimenting with his soil-based concoctions on himself.  

Still, his innovation risks led to the ground-breaking discovery that these ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) can transform sweat into something more useful. His company now generates almost $2.6 million revenue in cosmetic sprays, shampoos and moisturizers. Microbiomes, “commensal, symbiotic and pathogenic microorganisms that literally share our body space” are now the focus of many new products. The third annual Skin Microbiome Congress, for instance, welcomed established brands such as BASF, Bayer, Coty, Merck, Nestlé, L’Occitane, L’Oréal, and Unilever.

The article is a great example of a single researcher’s drive and creativity. He didn’t shy away from the tough stuff in pursuit of innovation.

An Eye-Opening Innovation Risk 

A second recent Business Week article is further evidence that it pays to swing for the fences. The article is about manufacturer W.L. Gore & Associates Inc., best known for the waterproof membrane Gore-Tex, and how its willingness to “take more chances” has led to its polymers being used in corneal implants.  

An obsession with a polymer called polytetrafluoroethylene, PTFE, led William Gore to his discovery of the lighter and yet stronger expanded ePTFE. The polymer is now not only used in waterproof wear, but also in air purifiers, dental floss, high-tension ropes, and stents and surgical patches.

Yet the company was stagnating as competitors introduced alternatives. Gore needed to get ambitious again. When Anuraag Singh encountered Gopalan Balaji in a lunch line at a corporate event, the two natives of India, where corneal blindness is a major issue, asked whether they couldn’t do more with their company’s polymer.

Innovation risks
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Enlisting others, their team sought to modify the polymer to be transparent and light bending in the same way that the human cornea tissue is in our eyes. Their first attempts fizzled and were shelved until a new CEO came to Gore and encouraged innovation risks anew.

With new seed funding to learn more from ophthalmologists, rethink the design, and reconsider their material choices, their team came up with a new prototype. As a sidebar, I have to applaud the hands-on discovery involved along the way: 

“We love putting prototypes and materials on the table,” Singh told Business Week.  “A typical meeting would involve the surgeon and the engineers ‘all kind of hunched over: feeling, touching, poking at things.’”

The result? An artificial cornea that may help to solve a pressing human health problem in developing countries. The plan is for continued research and testing the first implant in humans in 2020 with the goal of bringing it to market in 2026. With cornea tissue damage the 5th leading cause of blindness this innovation risk could have a happy ending.

Ultimately, these two examples are reminders that we need to look around, ask questions, and listen to our communities to come up with ideas. Then we need to take those necessary innovation risks!  

Creativity: Lessons Learned from Octopuses

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So, here we go again…intertwining two seemingly unrelated topics — creativity and eight-limbed ocean dwellers — in one interesting blog.

Over the years, as my readers know, I’ve enjoyed discussing fresh sources of innovation. Today, it’s the octopus. 

First some technical details: Octopuses have eight arms, round bodies and bulging bilateral eyes. The 300 species of octopuses live in all the world’s oceans, but prefer warmer, tropical waters. They typically only live between 1 and 2 years, but during that time they like to play. 

That leads us to the good stuff: These creative, intelligent creatures can problem solve and are masterful mimics. Some species can even change the texture of their skin to better hunt and evade predators. Plus, they all lack a rigid skeleton, which lets them contort themselves into amazing shapes. 

Check out the mimic octopus:

creativity
Click here to see the video!

Yet how does a creature that can only see in black and white make these changes? They control special cells just under their skin’s surface — chromatophores — which hold pigment and  change color within milliseconds. Controlled like muscles, these cells can help many octopuses “see” with their arms and learn the patterns, colors, and textures of other animals they want to imitate.  

Sy Montgomery, author of The Soul of an Octopus shares, “three-fifths of an octopus’ neurons are not in their brain, but in their arms,” which “suggests that each arm has a mind of its own”. These arms have sensory capabilities (smell and taste) as well as reach, and can even continue to grasp if severed from the body.

Wile. E. Octopus Creativity

The octopus is a living example of the sentiment in my first blog of 2019, Becoming Uncomfortable. The octopus is always exposing itself to new environments and facing predators.  With creativity and intelligent problem-solving it succeeds. Just as humans need to put themselves out there and expose themselves to new backgrounds, experiences, and more. We can’t blend in like the octopus, so we have to become uncomfortable, but it’s worth it. 

There’s also something we can gain from thinking about the octopuses seeing with their arms. Think how humans might engage differently if we could see with our arms?  We’d be sure to look at tasks in a different manner when thinking critically about process. 

Finally, let’s consider what we’d do with better camouflage. I don’t mean you should wear a disguise at work! Still, what if you were to try to camouflage your thinking. You too can be a masterful mimic to problem solve or put yourself in the shoes of the client: “I am not the sales engineer but the lead process engineer” or “I am the Director of Capital Purchasing” or “I am the entrepreneur who needs advice for a process solution while spending my own money.” 

We’re still stuck with bones, so we can’t morph into all the different shapes this amazing creature can manage. A 600-pound octopus can get through a pathway the diameter of a quarter! Yet, the octopus’s sense of adventure also underlines my suggestion to get out into the world and see what’s going on for a new perspective on process solutions and life in general.

I hope you’ll have some fun with this and think about the octopus next time you want to be creative!

Becoming Uncomfortable in 2019

leaders in filtration technology
Image source

Welcome to 2019.  

This blog marks the beginning of Perlmutter Unfiltered’s 5th year; it’s been fun writing and hearing from friends, colleagues, customers, and others from all over the world. I hope my mix of topics — innovation, leadership, and technical insight — have inspired you professionally and personally. 

Thinking about 2019 and preparing for another great year put me in mind of an interesting Fast Company article about what we can do to improve our work space.

Everyone gets comfortable at work, from where we sit and who we prefer to work with on our projects and teams.  As leaders in filtration technology, we look for “no-drama” days in which the process is optimized, production is overcapacity, and customers have no machine issues.  However, these calm and steady-state environments can lead to complacency and learning plateaus. On the flip side, when we experience periodic disruptions, we develop new views and new ideas.  

Therefore, for 2019,  I suggest “becoming uncomfortable.” Shake up projects, teams and tasks/responsibilities. Sit somewhere new. Push yourself personally and professionally to embrace change.

Becoming Uncomfortable

First, step-up to new roles and look for new responsibilities. This could be as simple as becoming an expert in distillation or solid-liquid separation (contact me and I can help you!) or developing expertise on a specific process at your company.  

Next, constantly challenge yourself to get better… call a vendor for a “lunch & learn” seminar, call a new customer and more importantly, make a call rather than sending an e-mail or text. The act of picking up the phone often makes us more uncomfortable in this digital age.

Going further, make small changes every day. A small change is easy to make and before long, the team, the process, the office will see improvements.  Working for BHS Filtration, we say, in German, eins bei eins (one by one) or as I like to say “millimeter by millimeter.”

So, let’s all become more uncomfortable in 2019. Make proactive changes rather than reactive.  Let me know your ideas on this, share your successes, and we can all learn to become uncomfortable together.  

Innovation Grown from Oranges

sustainable innovation
Photo credit: photoschafl via Foter.com / CC BY-NC-ND

I have written over the years about sustainability; you may remember Ford & Jose Cuervo. Today, I’m writing about a new idea for sustainable innovation grown from the rinds and seeds of Sicily’s most famous citrus fruit — the orange.

The orange, which Sicily harvests several hundred thousand tons each year, is being used in a wide range of greener and healthier business initiatives.

The innovation is as impressive as the filtration technology used to give consumers the pulp-free OJ they drink at breakfast on a given morning!

Oranges & Textiles

In 2011, Adriana Santonocito was a design student in Milan and had an idea to make sustainable textiles from Sicilian oranges. People already knew how to extract cellulose from orange rinds, but Adriana developed a process to make fiber which could be blended and the color-dyed with other textiles such as cotton or polyester. She and her classmate Enrica Arena founded Orange Fiber in 2014 and are now selling the silk-like material to the famous Italian fashion designer Salvatore Ferragamo. 

sustainable innovation
Source: Ferragamo

 

What else from the oranges?

They are also making baked goods healthier, and stay fresher, thanks to a new procedure which transforms them into an innovative fat-free flour /citrus paste. Pastazzo is flour made from the orange rinds, seeds and part of the pulp not used for juice. The “brioche” from this flour has the same taste and look of brioche made with butter/fats/oils but much healthier.

sustainable innovation
Source: La Sicilia

Although we’ve yet to be employed working with oranges, BHS has applied its leadership  in sustainability to feedstocks and applications including:

  • Corn cobs and stovers
  • Wood chips
  • Bagasse / Sugar cane
  • Dairy waste and chicken renderings
  • Algae and microbial for PHA
  • Fish Oils
  • Biocatalysts

I’d be happy to tell you more about our technology for filtration, cake washing and drying of these natural products with the BHS vacuum belt filter and rotary pressure filter.

Or, let us know your feedstocks and we can brainstorm new ideas for sustainable innovation. In the meantime, be aware you may be wearing something that you can eat!

Scaffolding for Creativity in Business

process solutions
Photo credit: 96dpi via Foter.com / CC BY-NC

We’ve all seen scaffolding set up to support work in the construction, maintenance, cleaning and repair of buildings, bridges, houses, and more. While these structures are rarely permanent — and are hoped to be in use only a short period of time — they must be reliable and up-to-date.

Now, you may ask, why blog about scaffolds?

The key point is that a scaffold is a critical support feature. Truly, everyone needs a scaffold for support in a job, business, and company and in their personal lives. I don’t claim to be a relationship guru, so let’s only focus on your job, business and company.

Scaffolding creativity

I maintain that the most important scaffold is creative people doing creative things. This can mean your clients as well as the technology supplier. For example, creative clients have brought to BHS applications for biochemicals (using straw, wheat, bagasse, wood and plastics), fats, lipids and proteins (using chicken renderings and process water used to clean equipment in dairy operations), amino acids, inorganic chemicals and salts, final and bulk pharmaceuticals and oil & gas and refinery operations, including offshore.

At the same time, BHS has provided unique and creative process solutions in all of these cases. One fun case saw us using dimethyl ether, under continuous pressure so it operates as a liquid, with zero fugitive emissions.

Creating permanence for creative mindset

Yet, while scaffolds are transient structures, in business we must consider the question of “how do we ensure the creative people maintain their creativity?” In a recent AICHE article Paul Baybutt stated, “while most people are born with the capacity for creative thinking, this skill can be lost through formal education and societal pressures that discourage it.”

Nevertheless, he noted, “luckily, creative thinking can be learned.” He described several characteristics of a creative thinker such as:

  • thinks imaginatively and with an open mind to new ideas
  • views issues as challenges
  • believes alternatives exist
  • able to live with ambiguity and tolerate a degree of chaos
  • self-confident and knows how to ask good questions.

process solutions
Photo credit: soham_pablo via Foter.com / CC BY

What can leaders and businesses do to keep the creative juices flowing? Baybutt provided some insights:

  • Be patient and curious
  • Persevere and maintain a positive frame of mind
  • Welcome challenges and embrace mistakes as learning experiences
  • Explore rather than prove
  • Follow your gut
  • Have a desire to “consider” rather than “argue.”

The idea behind scaffolding is to connect workers with their project in a safe, supported way. Creativity too will thrive in this environment — if we find ways to scaffold our creative thinkers to innovation success.