Selecting and Designing Combination Filtration for Solid-Liquid Separation

Filtration technology
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Filtration experts, over the years, have discussed combination filtration and debated its definition.

  • In the realm of cartridge filtration, simply defined, a combination filter is one that does at least one other processing job at the same time as filtering a suspension.  For example, this could be carbon canister which removes both suspended and dissolved components.
  • In water applications, a combination filter removes bacteria, sediment, chlorine taste and odor, and scale.
  • In lubrication oil filtration, combination filtration refers to full-flow and by-pass flow filtration.
  • For small scale process filtration, combination filtration is installing bag and cartridge filtration systems in series.

There is, however, a new definition of combination filtration that transcends the standard approach and will assist process engineers with trouble shooting and idea-generation.  The approach relies upon the slurry analysis and testing to uncover the “process symptom” and then develop a process solution called “combination mechanical slurry conditioning and filtration.”

Filtration Technology in Combination

There are, without doubt, many technologies already existing in the marketplace that can be applied in combination, including the use of chemicals such as flocculants and coagulants.  However, from a practical viewpoint, let me review general operating conditions at chemical plants and illustrate creative idea-generation when examining a process problem.

In this first case, we have a high solids slurry with a wide particle size distribution.  What should you do?  My idea is to provide filtration for the slurry with a continuous technology and let the fines bleed through; capture theses fines with clarification.  Yes, more filtration but a much more reliable system.

 

filtration procedure

This new definition of combination filtration will provide process engineers a framework for idea generation when analyzing an operating bottleneck.  Complete my application data sheets for new and existing application data for filtration for solid-liquid separation. Let us start the process.

Filtration of Liquefied Gases & Caesar’s Last Breath

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On the heels of my blog about “The Business of Breathing,” it’s time to talk about gas. I recently finished reading the Sam Kean book “Caesar’s Last Breath.”  For those of you who have not read Kean, his specialty is writing science books in an exciting and entertaining fashion.  His three other books focus on the elements in the periodic table, genetics, and the brain.  Meanwhile, Caesar’s Last Breath looks at gases and both how the atmosphere has shaped human beings and how human beings have shaped the atmosphere.

The word “gas” actually comes from the Greek word “Khaos” for chaos or empty space between the Greek gods and the earth. To the Greeks, gases were the least understood component and the most “wildest” of spirits that no one could tame.

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Today we know gases can become liquids, solids or stay as gases.  The book is a survey of the history of the earth explored through the air that we breathe and the scientists that made major discoveries of gaseous properties.

Believe it or not, there are good guys and bad guys and conflicts in the book.  Kean covers the earth’s early days, atomic tests at Bikini Atoll, details of UFO sightings in Roswell, New Mexico, and the truth behind the US Air Force tests.  There is a whole chapter on nitrous oxide (laughing gas) as well as the Manhattan Project and the development of ammonia gas and fertilizers.  Of course, there is a discussion of ice seeding for rain, which I am am keenly interested in as well (remember my blog on the Cat’s Cradle and the Vonnegut family?).  Finally, Caesar’s Last Breath concludes with alien life, new planets, greenhouse gases and other crazy ideas for other civilizations. All of these chapters are a lot of fun to read.

Relating my Reading to Filtration Tech

Yet, while all of this is very interesting, especially Kean’s scientific data, the question remains for my blog readers: how does BHS handle liquefied gasses?  Knowing that gases, under pressure, act as a liquid The BHS Rotary Pressure Filter can conduct filtration, washing, and drying of slurries continuously under pressure to keep the gas as a liquid. We also have installed units for Dimethyl Ether (DME) with specialty containment; contact me  for further information or discuss your critical filtration applications.

In the meantime, what have you been reading lately that you might suggest I pick up? I’m always on the lookout for new must-reads with a scientific bent.